Out of box thinking

Out of box thinking

 
 
Our mind generally classifies things into two categories: good and bad, here and there, old and new etc. No wonder we are caught most of the time in the paradigm of “what I know and what I do not know”. We seek to acquire the pleasant and get rid of the unpleasant in the domain of the ‘known’. We vaguely imagine pleasure and pain in the domain of the ‘unknown’ too and our effort is the same: get the comfort and avoid the discomfort.
 
“The liberating truth is neither the known nor the unknown,” says the Upanishad (Kena 1:4). This statement can lift the mind of anybody, exposed to the Vedānta tradition, to heights of meditation. The suggestion here opens a new window in contemplation and we see our own existence in new light. Behind knowing a million things and behind not knowing a trillion, we are the “principle of knowing” – which itself does not belong to either of the two boxes: known and unknown!
I AM THAT, where dualistic knowing takes place, which has the division of the known and the knower. I am the light that illumines the drama of collecting and losing, registering and forgetting, liking and hating etc.
 
Our eyes, ears and other sense organs bring to us much pleasure; we must not get stuck with them. Our mind ushers in a whole lot of intellectual excitements and sweet emotions; we must not be enclosed in it. Upanishads help us stand apart. Inspired by their revelations, we can reclaim the lost ground of “the ever-free Self”.
 
                                                                                                ~ Swami Chidananda
 
| anyadeva tad-viditād,atoaviditādadhi,  अन्यद् एव तद् विदिताद् , अतो अविदिताद् अधि ||